Charlotte is going to need a new interim mayor.

And that grocery store worker that claims Gov. Pat McCrory got him fired is going to need a new job placement counselor, now that Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon has resigned after being arrested yesterday on Federal bribery and corruption charges.

But a lot of questions remain.

Carolina Plotthound wonders why the US Attorney held off arresting Cannon until after he won election. He'd taken tens of thousands of dollars in bribes prior to the November 2013 election.

Also, the probe began in 2010 based on a tip that was generated in a separate unrelated case. But what kind of case yields a tip that a City Councilman is taking bribes in exchange for help in getting developments and rezonings approved?

The FBI detailed the cash deposits in Cannon's personal bank accounts dating back to 2007 and then seized all of Cannon's e-mails, phones, and data. How many Charlotte developers are reviewing all their bank accounts, e-mails, and campaign donations today? What other projects was Cannon trying juice for money?

And while I'm at it - the Democrats held their national convention in Charlotte in 2012. Did Cannon "raise money" for himself during that time period, too? Or was it just developers he was shaking down?

 

 

What the Foxx say?

Why is the former mayor offering "No comment?" Anthony Foxx is now the US Transportation Secretary. He's insulated from Queen City politics. Why would he not offer some boilerplate statement like Governor Pat McCrory did?

Speaking of Gov. McCrory, what the hell is wrong with CNN?

Hey @CNN -that's the Governor of NC NOT the Mayor of Charlotte! #CannonArrest #CNNfail pic.twitter.com/9IrZEPimKB

 

A similar phenomena  occurred at the News & Observer, when it's story identified Gov. McCrory as a Republican ... in the story about Cannon's arrest.

 

 

The mystery party

Yesterday laid bare the abject atrocity that is many American newsrooms, as outlet after outlet failed to identify Patrick Cannon as a Democrat.

It's embarrassing because it's so simple. The first time your report refers to the man, you call him "Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon."

The next time you refer to him, you call him "The first-term Democrat" or "The long-time Democratic official" or something. It's that easy.

It's like calling the apartment fire a "fire" on the first reference and a "blaze" on the second. It shouldn't be difficult.

But apparently it is.

The News & Observer piece on McCrory's reaction omits Cannon's party. But makes sure to mention another:

In conversations outlined in the criminal complaint, Cannon describes his close relationship with McCrory as an asset. He also touted ties to President Barack Obama and Republican state Sen. Bob Rucho of Charlotte.


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/03/26/3735428/gov-pat-mccrory-expresses-shock.html#storylink=cpy

The word Democrat is not mentioned anywhere in the entire piece. But Republican is. Funny how they were able to fit that word in.

It's so predictable that it's no longer a question of incompetence. There's no way to explain this repeated omission as anything other than intentional.

Evidence of this bias is also on display today as news outlets talk about how sad the story is. Had Pat McCrory been busted for this, do you think a cadre of reporters and editors would be adopting such a sympathetic posture?

Please. It would be proof that "corruption doesn't pay" and there would be all sorts of connections drawn between one man and every Republican in office.

It must be nice to be Democrats, knowing you get this kind of treatment from media. Maybe that's why Cannon thought he could get away with this stuff for so long.