Thousands Without Power After Tornado Sweeps Through Dallas Sunday Night

 

More than 100,000 residents in Dallas, Texas awoke Monday morning to no power following a destructive tornado that tore through the northern part of the city late Sunday night, authorities reported.

So far, no serious injuries or fatalities associated with the twister have been reported, the city said in a news release early Monday morning. Three people have been hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries, a fire-rescue spokesman told the Associated Press.

The National Weather Service reported a tornado touched down in the north and northeast parts of Dallas at around 9:48 p.m. Sunday, near Love Field. Radar tracked the 17-mile long path of the storm through the city, NBC Dallas-Fort Worth reported.

 

There were multiple reports of damaged homes and businesses as well as downed power lines with tree limbs and other debris scattered across roadways in the Dallas area. One of the buildings that was destroyed in Sunday night's storm was DFR station 41, with high winds blowing the roof off as well as damaging other parts of the building. No firefighters inside the building at the time were injured, Evans said.

Seven people reportedly managed to escape a structure that had collapsed in northwest Dallas with rescue crews searching the building to see if anyone was still left inside.

More than 100,000 people were without power as the sun rose on the city Monday, a spokesperson for the eletric utility Oncor, said. The city said at least six schools would be closed on Monday.

Most of the damage was limited to the northwest area of the cities. People posted video and photos of the storm as it moved across the area.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The National Weather Service says a line of severe weather was still moving southeast of the city on Monday, however, no severe weather was forecast for the rest of the day in Dallas. Other parts of the state, including eastern Texas, northwestern Louisiana and southwestern Arkansas were still under a tornado watch Monday morning.

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